Major sports brand apparels found to contain toxic chemicals

Major sports brand apparels found to contain toxic chemicals

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Apparels of some biggest brands in the sports world,Nike, Adidas and Puma test positive for  harmful chemicals.

In a jolting revelation made by the environmental organisation Greenpeace’s report on May 19, 2014,  the products of three international sports brands – Nike, Adidas and Puma were found to contain toxic chemicals in them.

The three companies are all major producers of sports apparel for the upcoming World Cup in Brazil.

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The environmental organisation in its report said that it sampled sporting goods from Nike, Puma and Adidas in 16 countries and regions across the world and that tests were conducted  on them for a period of 3 months.

Major revelations made by The Greenpeace report-

  • 81 percent of the three brands’ soccer shoes and 35 percent of their soccer performance shirts contained chemical residues of plasticiser and perfluorinated compounds.
  • The perfluorooctanoic acid index of an Adidas soccer boot ‘Predator’ had more than 15 times the standard quantity of the acid.
  • The perfluoroocanoic acid is a chemical used for making fabric waterproof and is not easily degradable.
  • The report has warned that a long  exposure to the chemical has been linked to fertility problems and the presence of the chemical in clothing is said to cause skin irritation.
  • The European Union rules have listed the chemical as high file substance. Animal tests have further confirmed that the chemical has plausible link to cancer.

Greenpeace has advised consumers  to stay wary of such products.The NGO has pushed the three sports brands to disclose information regarding toxicity in thier products as soon as possible.

However none of the three brands have made any  official statement in relation to the Greenpeace report.

It now remains to see whether the three sports world giants cruise into damage control mode or remain indifferent to the potentially damaging report.

Photo Credits: Telegraph